“Dr. Ibrahim Discusses “Bio-Identical Hormones; Facts not Fears” at tonight’s event

“Dr. Ibrahim Discusses “Bio-Identical Hormones; Facts not Fears” at tonight’s event

You have heard Dr. Ibrahim of Asheville Healthspan Md on Positively Living. Dr. Ibrahim has shared information on several topics including Bio- Identical Hormones.
You can meet and get your questions answered during tonight’s event…

“Dr. Ibrahim Discusses “Bio-Identical Hormones; Facts not Fears”

I will be giving a talk TONIGHT at the Asheville Compound Pharmacy on Bio-identical Hormones: “Facts not Fears, How natural hormones improve your health and well being!”

Current patients — bring a friend with you tomorrow night. If your friend becomes a patient you will both receive $50 off of your next visit!

Time: 6 pm to 7 pm
Place: Asheville Compound Pharmacy

Don’t wait! Call today at 348-7699 to reserve a seat for Dr. Ibrahim’s discussion TONIGHT.

Where: 760 Merrimon Ave, Asheville, NC 28804

6pm -7pm

Asheville HealthSpan MD | One Vanderbilt Park Drive | Suite 230 | Asheville | NC | 28803

Did you know men should do a monthly self exam for Testicular Cancer?

Did you know men should do a monthly self exam for Testicular Cancer?

I have seen quite a few stories this week of young men dying from Testicular Cancer. What is testicular cancer?
Happens most often in young men 20-34 but can happen at any age.
Men should perform a monthly self exam, just like a woman should for breast cancer .
Did you know a positive pregnancy test done by a man is a sign of testicular cancer? More on men who test positive on pregnancy test

Take a minute and learn the facts about this disease. Please click below for more info http://www.cancer.org/cancer/testicularcancer/

Our Thanks to Stasi Bodywork in Asheville and Black Mountain NC. A Proud sponsor of “Positively Living with Leslie Godbold”

Our Thanks to Stasi Bodywork in Asheville and Black Mountain NC. A Proud sponsor of “Positively Living with Leslie Godbold”

Stasi Bodywork has been a loyal sponsor of “Positively Living with Leslie Godbold” movement for years. Stasi believes in Leslie Godbold’s mission , to support and encourage women and girls to inspire personal growth, to increase confidence and empowerment in themselves while encouraging others growth and path! This mission is currently being achieved through syndicated radio shows, public speaking and promotional events and social media platforms.


Stasi is a women-owned business, now serving the communities of Asheville and Black Mountain. With years of hands-on experience, effectively addressing structural imbalances, we can help you achieve your desired goals while preventing future injuries. We have many options to gear your therapy in the direction most therapeutic to you and our knowledgeable staff is willing to help in any way to make your experience a very healing one. Massages, Chiropractic Treatments, Workout Training, Posture Alterations.

Did you know that over 90% of non-impact injuries can be traced back to postural imbalance through static or dynamic movements? We observe, record and educate on application of proper postural biomechanics and recommended treatment methods for self-maintenance.

Stasi Bodywork website
10 East Market Street, Suite B
Black Mountain, NC 28711

711 Biltmore Ave
Asheville NC 28803

Stasi is owned and managed by Allie Warfel LMBT, Janeen Hulbert DC, and Mary Prohaska.

Together, they joined forces to redefine healthcare. They believe health is relative to the “body-holder” and strive to provide the most effective therapies needed for lasting results so you can feel confident in your body!

Buncombe County has an outbreak of Pertsussis aka whooping cough per Buncombe County Health Department

Increase in Whooping Cough in WNC:
3 Steps that provide a “Shield of Protection”

Recently, there has been an increase in the number of persons sick with pertussis (whooping cough) in Western N.C., including Buncombe County and some surrounding counties. Buncombe County currently has 19 cases of pertussis.

Pertussis is an infection that affects the upper airways and is easily spread from person-to-person by coughing or sneezing. Anyone can get pertussis but it is especially dangerous and can even be deadly for babies. About 50% of all infants younger than one year of age who get pertussis are hospitalized. Most people who die from whooping cough are infants that are too young to be fully immunized.

At first, symptoms are typically like those of the common cold, including:
· Runny nose;
· Low-grade fever; and
· Mild, occasional cough.
· Infants may have a pause in their breathing, known as apnea.

After one to two weeks, symptoms can worsen to include:
· Severe coughing fits or spells, followed by a high-pitched “whoop” sound when a breath is taken;
· Vomiting (throwing-up) after coughing fits, especially in young children; and
· Exhaustion (feeling very tired) after coughing fits.
· The illness can be less severe and the typical “whoop” can be absent in teens and adults, especially those who have been immunized against pertussis.

Three simple steps can provide a shield of protection for individuals and their loved ones against pertussis and other deadly preventable diseases.

Step 1: Get Immunized
The best way to prevent pertussis is to get immunized. DTaP is the immunization given to infants and children starting at 2 months of age. Because young children are not adequately protected against pertussis until they have received at least three doses of DTaP, it is also especially important that family members, caregivers of infants, and members in our community are immunized against pertussis. Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendations, Buncombe County Medical Director Dr. Jennifer Mullendore strongly recommends a one-time Tdap booster for preteens, teens and adults. It is also recommended that all women receive a Tdap booster in the third trimester of each pregnancy, regardless of whether they were already immunized.

By staying up-to-date on immunizations, individuals provide a shield of protection not only for themselves and their loved ones but also to vulnerable populations like infants and small children, those with pre-existing health conditions, and the elderly by reducing the likelihood of spreading preventable communicable diseases like pertussis.

Step 2: Practice Good Health Habits
Practicing good health habits, like frequent handwashing or using alcohol-based hand sanitizers and covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, can help prevent the spread of pertussis and other illnesses.

Step 3: Sick? See your Health Care Provider
Early diagnosis and treatment of pertussis is very important to prevent spread of the infection. Anyone with symptoms of pertussis should stay home from school, work or other group activities and make an appointment with their doctor. Contact your health care provider if you or your child has symptoms of pertussis. Sometimes antibiotics are given to people who have been exposed to pertussis even if they don’t have symptoms. This is done to protect babies and other vulnerable people from pertussis.

Individuals should contact their health care provider, pharmacy or local health department to get up-to-date on Tdap and other immunizations to protect themselves and their families. Visit http://www.buncombecounty.org/immunize for more information and watch and share our Pertussis PSA below.

September is National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release August 30, 2013
Presidential Proclamation — National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2013


– – – – – – –



Every September, America renews our commitment to curing childhood cancer and offers our support to the brave young people who are fighting this disease. Thousands are diagnosed with pediatric cancer each year, and it remains the leading cause of death by disease for American children under 15. For those children and their families, and in memory of every young person lost to cancer, we unite behind improved treatment, advanced research, and brighter futures for young people everywhere.

Over the past few decades, we have made great strides in the fight against pediatric cancer. Thanks to significant advances in treatment over the last 30 years, the combined 5-year survival rate for children with cancer increased by more than 20 percentage points. Today, a substantial proportion of children diagnosed with cancer can anticipate a time when their illness will be in long-term remission or cured altogether.

My Administration is dedicated to carrying this progress forward. We are funding extensive research into the causes of childhood cancer and its safest and most effective treatments. We also remain committed to easing financial burdens on families supporting a loved one with cancer. Under the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies can no longer deny coverage to children with pre-existing conditions or set lifetime caps on essential health benefits. As of January 2014, insurers will be prohibited from dropping coverage for patients who choose to participate in a clinical trial, including clinical trials that treat childhood cancer.

All children deserve the chance to dream, discover, and realize their full potential. This month, we extend our support to young people fighting for that opportunity, and we recognize all who commit themselves to advancing the journey toward a cancer-free world.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2013 as National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. I encourage all Americans to join me in reaffirming our commitment to fighting childhood cancer.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.


Positively Living : Our guests Je’wana Grier-McEachin and Kathy Avery of ABIPA in Asheville NC

Positively Living : Our guests Je’wana Grier-McEachin and Kathy Avery of ABIPA in Asheville NC

Positively Living
by Leslie Godbold

My guests on this Sunday’s episode of Positively Living , is Je’wana Grier-McEachin and Kathy Avery with ABIPA

ABIPA stands for Asheville Buncombe Institute Parity of Achievement. Dedicated to improving the health of African Americans and all people of color. Plus uninsured neighbors.

ABIPA improves health conditions for African Americans by providing education, health services and advocacy from a unique understanding of the African American experience and a demonstrated ability to increase collaboration, connection, awareness and trust across diverse segments of the community.

You better hold onto your seat during this episode. Je’wana and Kathy were a breath of fresh air during our recording. You will enjoy this show while learning information that can help you and your neighbors!

ABIPA is achieving their goals of improving health in Western NC, find out about “Deserts with the Docs”, volunteers, collaborative efforts in this community with YMCA, YWCA, MAHEC, churches, Mission Hospitals, UNCA, Park Ridge Hospital this list goes on and on…..to help the people of western North Carolina.

Thanks Je’wana and Kathy!

 Tune in Sunday Noon-1pm am1350 or listen online at www.1350WZGM.com Sundays Noon- 1pm to listen to Positively Living!

This episode is the result of people sharing with others. A listener met Kathy while waiting in a lobby. Their conversation led the listener to contact us. If you know of a ministry or topic that needs to be heard, please contact us by email @ lesliegodbold@aol.com. Thank you!
Word of mouth is still the fastest way to get your message out! 
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If Heaven sends no supplies, The fairest bloom of the garden dies.  -William Browne